Getting The Facts On Recognising Indispensable Criteria Of Selection For Consultant

December 15, 2016 10:43:00 AM A consultant is advising Oktibbeha County supervisors to put the potential sale of OCH Regional Medical Center to a public vote. Ted Woodrell, of Woodrell Consulting, made the recommendation in a letter submitted Tuesday via email to each of the county’s supervisors. After an eight-point review of a Dec. 6 public hearing about the hospital, he also advises the board to continue to seek advice from the county’s legal counsel at Jackson-based Butler Snow. “A decision to seek a referendum may be the best way to garner the you could look here entire community’s input,” Woodrell wrote. “This should be strongly considered and discussed with Butler Snow.” The board hired Woodrell Consulting earlier in the year to assist supervisors and hospital administration in determining which firm would conduct an analysis of OCH — an analysis being the first required legal step before selling or leasing a publicly-owned hospital. Supervisors hired Tennessee-based Stroudwater and Associates, which submitted a report in October. Stroudwater’s report stated OCH generates adequate cash flow to stay in operation and service its existing debt load on a standalone basis, but an annual gap of $3 million to $4 million exists between current operating results and needed levels of performance before strategic capital investments are considered. The report suggested supervisors seek transaction proposals for the hospitals, which has sparked fears in the community that the board will press ahead in an attempt to sell the facility. In an interview, Woodrell told The Dispatch he believes the magnitude of the decision about whether to sell or lease the hospital or keep it as a publicly-owned facility compels a voter referendum. “This is such a big decision that I suggested they go ahead with a referendum,” he said. “This is a huge decision for Oktibbeha County. I believe in the democratic process. Let the people vote.” Supervisors will ultimately choose whether the matter goes to a referendum if a petition fails to gather enough signatures to force the matter. Frank Davis, a former Starkville alderman and supporter of OCH as a publicly-owned hospital, is spearheading efforts to get enough signatures to force a hospital transaction to a vote. Davis recently told The Dispatch his effort is close to the 1,500 signatures required by law and will continue until it reaches 2,000 signatures.

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.cdispatch.com/news/article.asp?aid=54961

Image: US-POLITICS-TRUMP The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals is currently considering the legality of the rule. Related: you can find out more Obama Caps Environmental Legacy With Paris Climate Change Deal Trump could have several paths to rolling back the plan, based on the court’s decision, Freeman wrote after the election , but he could still potentially face legal battles. Freeman added that she “wouldn’t be surprised” if the current administration’s moratorium on new coal leases on federal lands , announced in January, were lifted “fairly quickly” as it did not go through as lengthy of a rule-making process. Activists have also expressed concern over the fate of the controversial Dakota Access oil pipeline and privatization of tribal lands. Earlier this month, Trump’s transition team came under fire from Native American environmental activists for a proposal to privatize up to 56 million acres of tribal lands for resource extraction. Play Copy this code to your website or blog For Kandi Mossett of the Indigenous Environmental Network, privatizing Native lands is an attempt to “exploit us” for oil, gas, coal and uranium. In 2009, the Council of Energy Resource Tribes, a tribal energy consortium, estimated the worth of Indian energy resources to be upwards of $1.5 trillion representing about 20 percent of the nation’s untapped oil and gas reserves. Related: What’s Next for the Dakota Access Pipeline?

For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/what-could-trump-administration-mean-environment-n697416?cid=public-rss_20161219

According to the Economist, 55% of the world’s leading companies have policies to reduce energy consumption but 86% of those companies lack the capability to measure and report on their carbon footprint. website link Management consultants are in a prime position to introduce corporate sustainability to companies and governments worldwide. Studies show that to successfully incorporate corporate sustainability in companies, it is crucial that this type of initiatives and practices be aligned with the overall corporate strategy. “Carbon neutrality”, or having a net zero carbon footprint, refers to achieving net zero carbon emissions by balancing a measured amount of carbon released with an equivalent amount sequestered or offset, or buying enough carbon credits to make up the difference. Some currently offer sustainability consulting as a component of their risk and change management practices. Established consulting firms doing this include: McKinley, boo amp; Co, Accenture, Deloitte, BC, PAC, and A.T. Executing a corporate sustainability strategy is usually a challenge though. Kearney.

You may also be interested to read